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Title: Social psychological benefits of a wilderness adventure program

Author: Paxton, Todd; McAvoy, Leo H.;

Date: 2000

Source: In: McCool, Stephen F.; Cole, David N.; Borrie, William T.; O’Loughlin, Jennifer, comps. 2000. Wilderness science in a time of change conference—Volume 3: Wilderness as a place for scientific inquiry; 1999 May 23–27; Missoula, MT. Proceedings RMRS-P-15-VOL-3. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 202-206

Publication Series: Proceedings (P)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Wilderness-based outdoor adventure programs are intended to produce positive change in participants. There are a significant number of these programs, with Hattie and others (1997) reporting that in 1994 alone, there were over 40,000 students participating in Outward Bound programs. Not all of these programs occur in wilderness, but significant portions of them do. A major goal of these programs is the improvement and development of participants’ self-concept and self-efficacy through wilderness-based activities. These activities provide opportunities for physical, emotional and cognitive challenges and opportunities for success. Research has demonstrated that these programs have an impact on participants’ awareness of themselves and others (Hattie and others 1997). Another goal of some programs is to create and foster a wilderness/environmental awareness that enhances the participants’ ability to perceive and identify with the environment and to generate concern and commitment to the continued preservation of nature and wilderness (McAvoy 1987).

Keywords: wilderness, outdoor recreation, self-efficacy, benefits, social psychology

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Paxton, Todd; McAvoy, Leo H. 2000. Social psychological benefits of a wilderness adventure program. In: McCool, Stephen F.; Cole, David N.; Borrie, William T.; O’Loughlin, Jennifer, comps. 2000. Wilderness science in a time of change conference—Volume 3: Wilderness as a place for scientific inquiry; 1999 May 23–27; Missoula, MT. Proceedings RMRS-P-15-VOL-3. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 202-206

 


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