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Title: Physiological, anatomical, and ecological characteristics of southern live oak

Author: Qi, Yadong; Favorite, Jammie; Chin, Kit L.; Xiao, Ying;

Date: 2006

Source: Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-92. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 448-453

Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Gas exchanges of sun-exposed and shaded leaves of southern live oak (Quercus virginiana Mill.) were studied monthly from May to September, 2000. Six healthy live oak trees with d.b.h. ranging from 21 to 148 cm on Southern University’s campus in Baton Rouge, LA, were selected for the study. Instantaneous gas exchanges were measured during clear sky days from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. using a portable gas exchange system. Leaf chlorophyll, moisture content, and environmental conditions were also monitored. Anatomy of sun-exposed and shaded leaves was studied in July using a scanning electron microscopy. Sun-exposed leaves had significantly higher net carbon dioxide (CO2) uptake rate, transpiration rate, and chlorophyll content, and significantly lower internal CO2 concentration and moisture content than the shaded leaves. The leaf anatomy related well to the leaf physiology. The sun-exposed leaves had a remarkably denser trichome layer and more closely packed palisade mesophyll cells than the shaded leaves. The combined leaf anatomy and physiology indicate that southern live oak possesses a unique ecological advantage of self defense against various environmental stresses.

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Qi, Yadong; Favorite, Jammie; Chin, Kit L.; Xiao, Ying 2006. Physiological, anatomical, and ecological characteristics of southern live oak. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-92. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 448-453

 


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