Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern Research Station
Help
 

Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

View PDF (736 KB bytes)

Title: Forest ecosystem health in the inland west

Author: Sampson, R. Neil; Clark, Lance R.; Morelan, Lynnette Z.;

Date: 1995

Source: In: L. G. Eskew, comp. Forest health through silviculture: proceedings of the 1995 National Silviculture Workshop, Mescalero, New Mexico, May 8-11, 1995. Gen. Tech. Rep. RM-GTR-267. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station: 53-62

Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: For the past four years, American Forests has focused much of its policy attention on forest health, highlighted by a forest health partnership in southern Idaho. The partnership has been hard at work trying to better understand the forests of the Inland West. Our goal has been to identify what is affecting these forests, why they are responding differently to climate stress than they did in the past, and what needs to be done to improve their health and resilience. Findings to date suggest that disruption of forest ecosystem processes and functions has significantly altered the natural role of fire in the region, particularly in the low-elevation, long-needled pine forest type. The result is millions of acres of unhealthy forest that do not meet the needs of society, and according to several scientists, may be on the verge of ecological collapse. The expansion of our early work has led to several features in regional and national media, and opportunities to share our findings and better inform interested members of Congress. A national survey on forest management commissioned late last fall gives us an indication that the public is generally supportive of management rather than letting nature take its course. However, public perceptions with respect to forest health and the role of fire suggest a need for more information and education on these issues. With the current volatile debate on salvage logging after the 1994 fires raging throughout the West, there is a considerable need to continue to raise awareness on forest health within the federal agencies, with the general public, and with policymakers.

Keywords: forest health, forest ecology, ecosystems

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
  • You may send email to rmrspubrequest@fs.fed.us to request a hard copy of this publication. (Please specify exactly which publication you are requesting and your mailing address.)

XML: View XML

Citation:


Sampson, R. Neil; Clark, Lance R.; Morelan, Lynnette Z. 1995. Forest ecosystem health in the inland west. In: L. G. Eskew, comp. Forest health through silviculture: proceedings of the 1995 National Silviculture Workshop, Mescalero, New Mexico, May 8-11, 1995. Gen. Tech. Rep. RM-GTR-267. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station: 53-62

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.