Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern Research Station
Help
 

Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

View PDF (651 KB bytes)

Title: Fire, competition and forest pests: landscape treatment to sustain ecosystem function

Author: McDonald, Geral I.; Harvey, A. E.; Tonn, J. R.;

Date: 2000

Source: In: Neuenschwander, Leon F.; Ryan, Kevin C., tech. eds. Proceedings from the Joint Fire Science Conference and Workshop: crossing the millennium: integrating spatial technologies and ecological principles for a new age in fire management; the Grove Hotel, Boise, Idaho, June 15-17, 1999. Moscow, Idaho: University of Idaho, 2000: 195-211

Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication

Description: Fire, competition for light and water, and native forest pests have interacted for millennia in western forests to produce a countryside dominated by seral species of conifers. These conifer-dominated ecosystems exist in six kinds of biotic communities. We divided one of these communities, the Rocky Mountain Montane Conifer Forest, into 31 subseries based on the ability of shrubs and forbs to predict soil-moisture regimes and conifers to predict soil-temperature regimes. This classification facilitated correlation of fire regimes, ecophysiological theory, and genetic theory to create an analytical framework for assessing ecological change. Using this tool we assessed likely ecologic impacts resulting from the introduction of white pine blister rust. Because large-scale disturbance, fire and cutting, have been greatly reduced in western ecosystems most heavily impacted by blister rust, their restoration will require large-scale replacement of the role of fire. Reduced net primary productivity is a natural consequence of forest succession. As forests age, photosynthetic and water use efficiencies decline, while decomposition in the standing biomass increases. Most forests reach a point where carbon release exceeds carbon sequestration–the “pathologic rotation.” Effective management of these forces will require exact knowledge, ecosystem by ecosystem, of resource availability and system processing efficiencies. Using the classification presented, theories of competition, ecophysiology, genetics and pest behavior can be combined to examine site-specific ecosystem behavior. Finally, a preliminary plan to achieve process sustainability is presented.

Keywords: fire regimes, root rot, blister rust, western white pine, habitat types, biotic communities

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
  • You may send email to rmrspubrequest@fs.fed.us to request a hard copy of this publication. (Please specify exactly which publication you are requesting and your mailing address.)

XML: View XML

Citation:


McDonald, Geral I.; Harvey, A. E.; Tonn, J. R. 2000. Fire, competition and forest pests: landscape treatment to sustain ecosystem function. In: Neuenschwander, Leon F.; Ryan, Kevin C., tech. eds. Proceedings from the Joint Fire Science Conference and Workshop: crossing the millennium: integrating spatial technologies and ecological principles for a new age in fire management; the Grove Hotel, Boise, Idaho, June 15-17, 1999. Moscow, Idaho: University of Idaho, 2000: 195-211

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.