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Publication Information

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Title: Longleaf Pine Regeneration and Management: An Overstory Overview

Author: Boyer, William D.;

Date: 1997

Source: In: Kush, John S., comp. proceedings of the Longleaf Pine Ecosystem Restoration Symposium, presented at the Society of Ecological Restoration 9th Annual Conference - Ecological Restoration and Regional Strategies. 1997 November 12-15. Longleaf Fort Lauderdale, FL. 14-19.

Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication

Description: Longleaf pine is the key tree in fire-dependent ecosystems long native to the southeastern United States. Once the most extensive forest ecosystem in North America dominated by a single species, it now occupies only a small fraction of its former range. Longleaf has the reputation of being a slow-growing species that is nearly impossible to regenerate and so unable to economically compete with other species. Yet, this is a high-quality timber tree providing a host of products. It also tolerates fire and is resistant to most of the serious insects and diseases that afflict other southern pines. Longleaf pine can be naturally regenerated at low cost and with a high probability of success if needed cultural treatments are properly timed and executed. Some evidence suggests that the species'reputation for slow growth may be more myth than reality. More than any other southern pine, the many distinctive attributes of longleaf make it uniquely adapted to a broad range of site conditions, management goals, and silvicultuml methods.

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Boyer, William D. 1997. Longleaf Pine Regeneration and Management: An Overstory Overview. In: Kush, John S., comp. proceedings of the Longleaf Pine Ecosystem Restoration Symposium, presented at the Society of Ecological Restoration 9th Annual Conference - Ecological Restoration and Regional Strategies. 1997 November 12-15. Longleaf Fort Lauderdale, FL. 14-19.

 


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