Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern Research Station
Help
 

Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

View PDF (1.4 MB bytes)

Title: Livestock forage conditioning: bluebunch wheatgrass, Idaho fescue, and bottlebrush squirreltail.

Author: Ganskopp, Dave; Svejcar, Tony; Vavra, Marty.;

Date: 2004

Source: Journal of Range Management. 57(4): 384-392

Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication

Description: Research on Anderson and Scherzinger's hypothesis that spring cattle grazing can positively affect subsequent nutritional characteristics of grasses have generated mixed results. Our objectives were: 1) to evaluate fall/winter nutritional indices of bluebunch wheatgrass (Agropyron spicatum [Pursh] Scribn. & Smith), Idaho fescue (Festuca idahoensis Elmber.), and bottlebrush squirreltail (Sitanion hystrix (Nutt.) Smith) in ungrazed, lightly grazed (33% utilization), or heavily grazed (69% utilization) pastures stocked with cattle at the boot stage of growth; and 2) to quantify opportunity costs of applying those treatments on fall standing crop. Compared with ungrazed stands, light and heavy spring grazing decreased September standing crop by 32 and 67%; respectively. September/December crude protein (CP) among heavily grazed grasses (x = 6.9%) exceeded ungrazed controls (x = 3.9%) for 11 of 12 comparisons. Crude protein of lightly grazed grasses (x = 5.2%) as higher than ungrazed controls for 6 of 12 comparisons. Herbage was more nutritious during the drier of the 2 years sampled. Among grazed treatments, fall/winter CP measures were highest for bottlebrush squirreltail (x = 7.4%), intermediate for Idaho fescue (5.9%), and lowest for bluebunch wheatgrass (O = 4.9%). In fall/winter, herbage was most digestible in heavily grazed paddocks (x = 59%), intermediate in lightly grazed paddocks (x = 53%), and least digestible in ungrazed areas (x = 49%). Light and heavy spring cattle grazing can augment fall/winter forage quality of bluebunch wheatgrass, Idaho fescue and, bottlebrush squirreltail. Spring grazing reduces subsequent standing crop, but remaining forage will be nutritionally superior to herbage in ungrazed stands.

Keywords: Agropyron spicatum, Festuca idahoensis, Sitanion hystrix, beef cattle, big game, winter range, wildlife, habitat, diet quality

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
  • You may send email to pnw_pnwpubs@fs.fed.us to request a hard copy of this publication. (Please specify exactly which publication you are requesting and your mailing address.)

XML: View XML

Citation:


Ganskopp, Dave; Svejcar, Tony; Vavra, Marty. 2004. Livestock forage conditioning: bluebunch wheatgrass, Idaho fescue, and bottlebrush squirreltail. Journal of Range Management. 57(4): 384-392

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.