Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern Research Station
Help
 

Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

View PDF (270 K bytes)

Title: Chapter 6. Modeling human impacts to the Borderlands environment from a fire ecology perspective

Author: Fish, Suzanne K.;

Date: 2006

Source: In: Fish, Paul R.; Fish, Suzanne K.; Madsen, John H. 2006. Prehistory and early history of the Malpai Borderlands: Archaeological synthesis and recommendations. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-176. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 63-70

Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Theoretical and topical orientations in current archaeology address the interaction between past human populations and their environment. These themes reflect ecological frameworks that were incorporated into the social sciences by the 1950s, as exemplified by the influential publication, Man?s Role in Changing the Face of the Earth (Thomas 1956). Cultural practices for actively manipulating targeted species and ultimately modifying vegetation structure have been highlighted in recent studies of foraging societies and have gained recognition as key processes in the transition from hunting and gathering to farming economies (for example, Hillman and Harris 1989; Price and Gebauer 1995; Smith 1992). From this background of such interests, archaeologists are increasingly involved in examining the relationships between prehistoric peoples and precontact vegetation on what are now public lands in the United States.

Keywords: Malpai Borderlands, archaeology, Mimbres culture, Animas phase, Paquime, ecological frameworks, social sciences, cultural practices, precontact vegetation

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
  • You may send email to rmrspubrequest@fs.fed.us to request a hard copy of this publication. (Please specify exactly which publication you are requesting and your mailing address.)

XML: View XML

Citation:


Fish, Suzanne K. 2006. Chapter 6. Modeling human impacts to the Borderlands environment from a fire ecology perspective. In: Fish, Paul R.; Fish, Suzanne K.; Madsen, John H. 2006. Prehistory and early history of the Malpai Borderlands: Archaeological synthesis and recommendations. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-176. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 63-70

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.