Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern Research Station
Help
 

Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

View PDF (275 K bytes)

Title: Influences on USFS District Rangers' Decision to Authorize Wildland Fire Use

Author: Williamson, Martha A.;

Date: 2006

Source: In: Andrews, Patricia L.; Butler, Bret W., comps. 2006. Fuels Management-How to Measure Success: Conference Proceedings. 28-30 March 2006; Portland, OR. Proceedings RMRS-P-41. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 67-77

Publication Series: Proceedings (P)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: United States wildland fire policy and program reviews in 1995 and 2000 required reduction of hazardous fuel and recognition of fire as a natural process. Although an existing policy, Wildland Fire Use (WFU), permitted managing natural ignitions to meet resource benefits, most fuel reduction is still achieved through mechanical treatments and prescribed burning. However resource constraints suggest that successful fuel and ecosystem management hinges on expanding WFU. The decision to authorize WFU in the U.S. Forest Service rests with line officers, and the ‘go/no go’ decision constitutes a time-critical risk assessment. Factors influencing this decision clearly impact the viability of WFU.

This study examined influences on line officers’ go/no go decision. A telephone survey was conducted of all U.S. Forest Service district rangers with WFU authority in the Northern, Intermountain, and Southwestern Regions. The census was completed during February 2005 and obtained an 85 percent response rate. Data were analyzed using classification and regression tree (CART) analysis.

Personal commitment to WFU provided the primary classifier for 91 percent of the district rangers who authorized WFU. External factors, negative public perception, resource availability, and a perceived lack of support from the Agency were the main disincentives to authorizing WFU.

Keywords: fire, fire ecology, fuels management, wildland fire policy, Wildland Fire Use, WFU, line officers, go/no go decision, classification and regression tree (CART) analysis

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
  • You may send email to rmrspubrequest@fs.fed.us to request a hard copy of this publication. (Please specify exactly which publication you are requesting and your mailing address.)

XML: View XML

Citation:


Williamson, Martha A. 2006. Influences on USFS District Rangers'' Decision to Authorize Wildland Fire Use. In: Andrews, Patricia L.; Butler, Bret W., comps. 2006. Fuels Management-How to Measure Success: Conference Proceedings. 28-30 March 2006; Portland, OR. Proceedings RMRS-P-41. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 67-77

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.