Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern Research Station
Help
 

Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

View PDF (315 K bytes)

Title: Fire Severity and Intensity During Spring Burning in Natural and Masticated Mixed Shrub Woodlands

Author: Bradley, Tim; Gibson, Jennifer; Bunn, Windy;

Date: 2006

Source: In: Andrews, Patricia L.; Butler, Bret W., comps. 2006. Fuels Management-How to Measure Success: Conference Proceedings. 28-30 March 2006; Portland, OR. Proceedings RMRS-P-41. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 419-428

Publication Series: Proceedings (P)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Fire risk is an ever present management concern in many urban interface regions. To mitigate this risk, land management agencies have expanded their options beyond prescribed fire to include vegetation mastication and other mechanical fuel treatments. This research project examined fire severity and intensity in masticated and unmanipulated units that were burned in spring in a Northern California mixed shrub woodland. Mastication treatments significantly altered the fuel profile, resulting in an approximate 200 percent average increase in woody fuel cover for 1-hr and 1000-hr TLFM size classes, and greater than 300 percent average cover increase in 10-hr and 100-hr TLFM size classes. The mean flame length (29 vs. 10 inches/ 74 vs. 25 cm) and flame zone depth (20 vs. 6 inches/ 51 vs. 15 cm) were significantly greater (P<0.001) in masticated units than in unmanipulated units as were the mean temperatures at the litter surface (657°F vs. 219°F/ 347°C vs. 104°C) and 1.64 ft (0.5 m) above the litter surface (277°F vs. 59°F/ 136°C vs. 15°C) (P<0.001). Greater flaming and heat release in the masticated units led to increased mortality of overstory and pole-sized oaks and conifers posing conflicts with the management objective of retaining overstory vegetation.

Keywords: fire, fire ecology, fuels management, fire severity, fire intensity, vegetation mastication, mechanical fuel treatments

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
  • You may send email to rmrspubrequest@fs.fed.us to request a hard copy of this publication. (Please specify exactly which publication you are requesting and your mailing address.)

XML: View XML

Citation:


Bradley, Tim; Gibson, Jennifer; Bunn, Windy 2006. Fire Severity and Intensity During Spring Burning in Natural and Masticated Mixed Shrub Woodlands. In: Andrews, Patricia L.; Butler, Bret W., comps. 2006. Fuels Management-How to Measure Success: Conference Proceedings. 28-30 March 2006; Portland, OR. Proceedings RMRS-P-41. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 419-428

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.