Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern Research Station
Help
 

Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

View PDF (630 KB bytes)

Title: The Teakettle experiment

Author: North, Malcolm P.;

Date: 2002

Source: In: Verner, Jared, tech. editor. Proceedings of a Symposium on the Kings River Sustainable Forest Ecosystem Project: Progress and Current Status. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-183, Albany, CA: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture: 47-54

Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: A critical question in the Sierra Nevada concerns how to use disturbance effectively to restore forest ecosystems after nearly a century of fire suppression. With increases in stem densities and ladder fuels, many forests require a combination of stand thinning and controlled burning to mimic natural fire intensity. In spite of their widespread use, the different effects of fire and thinning on fundamental ecological processes have never been studied in mixed-conifer forests of the Sierra Nevada. The Teakettle Ecosystem Experiment is designed to compare these effects in an old-growth, experimental forest by applying fire and thinning manipulations in a factorial design. By using integrated sampling methods, coordinated studies will follow vegetation, soil, microclimate, invertebrate, and tree response variables before and after treatments on replicated plots. These five component studies will provide a core understanding of changes in ecosystem allocations of energy, water, and nutrients among plants and first-order consumers. Responses of these baseline processes should provide important metrics of fundamental changes in ecosystem conditions throughout higher trophic levels. This experiment can provide an important contrast of how the type and intensity of disturbance affect forest functions and succession.

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

XML: View XML

Citation:


North, Malcolm P. 2002. The Teakettle experiment. In: Verner, Jared, tech. editor. Proceedings of a Symposium on the Kings River Sustainable Forest Ecosystem Project: Progress and Current Status. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-183, Albany, CA: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture: 47-54

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.