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Publication Information

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Title: Watershed analysis

Author: Gallegos, Alan;

Date: 2002

Source: In: Verner, Jared, tech. editor. Proceedings of a Symposium on the Kings River Sustainable Forest Ecosystem Project: Progress and Current Status. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-183, Albany, CA: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture: 55-62

Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Watershed analyses and assessments for the Kings River Sustainable Forest Ecosystems Project were done on about 33,000 acres of the 45,500-acre Big Creek watershed and 32,000 acres of the 85,100-acre Dinkey Creek watershed. Following procedures developed for analysis of cumulative watershed effects (CWE) in the Pacific Northwest Region of the USDA Forest Service, the present project is comparing the Equivalent Roaded Area (ERA) method used widely in the Pacific Southwest Region of the Forest Service, a method that has several inherent weaknesses. Selected stream reaches have been described in terms of Rosgen channel types, Phankuch stream stability, and V-star ratings. Preliminary results from the ERA method indicate that 4 of 15 subwatersheds in the Big Creek watershed and 7 of 33 subwatersheds in the Dinkey Creek watershed are at or above the threshold of concern. Results from the ERA method indicate that several subwatersheds, but no stream reaches, are of concern. By contrast, results from more specific stream surveys, an inventory of fish habitat conditions, and data on sediment delivery attributable to roads indicate concern for several stream reaches as well.

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Gallegos, Alan 2002. Watershed analysis. In: Verner, Jared, tech. editor. Proceedings of a Symposium on the Kings River Sustainable Forest Ecosystem Project: Progress and Current Status. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-183, Albany, CA: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture: 55-62

 


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