Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern Research Station
Help
 

Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

View PDF (410 KB bytes)

Title: Seasonality and abundance of truffles from oak woodlands to red fir forests

Author: North, Malcolm P.;

Date: 2002

Source: In: Verner, Jared, tech. editor. Proceedings of a Symposium on the Kings River Sustainable Forest Ecosystem Project: Progress and Current Status. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-183, Albany, CA: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture: 91-98

Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Truffles are an important food source for many small mammals in forest ecosystems; however, we know little about the seasonality, abundance, or diversity of the truffle community in the Sierra Nevada. This study examined how truffle abundance and diversity varied between oak woodland, ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa), mixed-conifer, and red fir (Abies magnifica) forests. Species richness (number of species) and abundance of truffles were highest in ponderosa pine stands, but species evenness was greatest in mixed-conifer stands. Truffle biomass peaked in late spring and fall, tracking precipitation patterns with a 1-2 month lag. At least 65 species of truffles were identified in a 1-ha sample of the forest. This number is still only a fraction of the fungal species present, as many mycorrhizae rarely produce fruiting bodies. Truffle production depends on the condition of the truffle’s mycorrhizal host trees. Natural or human disturbances, which affect the age and composition of the forest, will affect truffle abundance and the animals that depend on them for a substantial portion of their diet.

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

XML: View XML

Citation:


North, Malcolm P. 2002. Seasonality and abundance of truffles from oak woodlands to red fir forests. In: Verner, Jared, tech. editor. Proceedings of a Symposium on the Kings River Sustainable Forest Ecosystem Project: Progress and Current Status. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-183, Albany, CA: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture: 91-98

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.