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Title: Effects of a prescribed fire on oak woodland stand structure

Author: Fry, Danny L.;

Date: 2002

Source: In: Standiford, Richard B., et al, tech. editor. Proceedings of the Fifth Symposium on Oak Woodlands: Oaks in California's Challenging Landscape. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-184, Albany, CA: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture: 235-242

Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Fire damage and tree characteristics of mixed deciduous oak woodlands were recorded after a prescription burn in the summer of 1999 on Mt. Hamilton Range, Santa Clara County, California. Trees were tagged and monitored to determine the effects of fire intensity on damage, recovery and survivorship. Fire-caused mortality was low; 2-year post-burn survey indicates that only three oaks have died from the low intensity ground fire. Using ANOVA, there was an overall significant difference for percent tree crown scorched and bole char height between plots, but not between tree-size classes. Using logistic regression, tree diameter and aspect predicted crown resprouting. Crown damage was also a significant predictor of resprouting with the likelihood increasing with percent scorched. Both valley and blue oaks produced crown resprouts on trees with 100 percent of their crown scorched. Although overall tree damage was low, crown resprouts developed on 80 percent of the trees and were found as shortly as two weeks after the fire. Stand structural characteristics have not been altered substantially by the event. Long term monitoring of fire effects will provide information on what changes fire causes to stand structure, its possible usefulness as a management tool, and how it should be applied to the landscape to achieve management objectives.

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Fry, Danny L. 2002. Effects of a prescribed fire on oak woodland stand structure. In: Standiford, Richard B., et al, tech. editor. Proceedings of the Fifth Symposium on Oak Woodlands: Oaks in California''s Challenging Landscape. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-184, Albany, CA: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture: 235-242

 


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