Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern Research Station
Help
 

Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

View PDF (380 KB bytes)

Title: Genetic differentiation of two California red oak species, Quercus parvula var. shreveii and Q. wislizeni, based on AFLP genetic markers

Author: Kashani, Nasser; Dodd, Richard S.;

Date: 2002

Source: In: Standiford, Richard B., et al, tech. editor. Proceedings of the Fifth Symposium on Oak Woodlands: Oaks in California's Challenging Landscape. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-184, Albany, CA: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture: 417-426

Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Oaks are renowned for posing problems in defining species boundaries. One example is the case of the interior live oak complex that is usually taken to include two varieties of Quercus wislizeni from the Coast Ranges of California and the Sierra Nevada, and Q. parvula var. shreveii from the central coast of California. The latter taxon was separated from Q. wislizeni, and was recognized in The Jepson Manual, but still is not fully accepted, since its morphological separation is ambiguous. In an attempt to test differentiation of these two taxa, molecular genetic analysis was carried out using Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) markers. A total of 202 individuals from 19 populations including Q. parvula var. shreveii, Quercus wislizeni, Q. kelloggii and Q. agrifolia were analyzed. Four primer sets generated 311 polymorphic band classes. Although species-specific markers were observed between Q. kelloggii and other members of the red oak group in California, fixed genetic differences were not apparent among Q. agrifolia, Q. parvula var. shreveii and Q. wislizeni. Cluster analysis and principal coordinate analysis revealed low levels of genetic differentiation among coast live oak, interior live oak and shreve oak. Cluster analysis also suggested that Q. agrifolia populations are more similar to populations of Q. parvula var. shreveii than to coastal populations of Q. wislizeni. This may reflect the relatively short time since divergence of these species. On the other hand, repetitive hybridization and introgression may have acted as a homogenizing factor for these genetic markers. The relatively high genetic similarity between Q. agrifolia and Q. parvula var. shreveii may have implications for the management of Sudden Oak Death in the limited range of the latter taxon.

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

XML: View XML

Citation:


Kashani, Nasser; Dodd, Richard S. 2002. Genetic differentiation of two California red oak species, Quercus parvula var. shreveii and Q. wislizeni, based on AFLP genetic markers. In: Standiford, Richard B., et al, tech. editor. Proceedings of the Fifth Symposium on Oak Woodlands: Oaks in California''s Challenging Landscape. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-184, Albany, CA: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture: 417-426

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.