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Title: A comparison of the history and management of oak woodlands in Britain and California

Author: McCreary, Douglas; Kerr, Gary;

Date: 2002

Source: In: Standiford, Richard B., et al, tech. editor. Proceedings of the Fifth Symposium on Oak Woodlands: Oaks in California's Challenging Landscape. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-184, Albany, CA: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture: 529-539

Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Hardwood forests are principal features of the landscape of both California and Britain and indigenous oak species are important components. In both locales these "oak woodlands" have historically provided a wide variety of commercial and non-commercial products and benefits and are deeply valued and appreciated by those who live in and around them. However, human-induced impacts have reduced the original forest cover in each area and there is concern that oak woodlands are still at risk, especially from impacts associated with increasing residential land-use conversion. While there are similarities in how these woodlands have been managed and used in both locations, there are also striking differences. In Britain the impacts to woodlands have occurred over millennia, rather than centuries, and the reduction in original forest cover has been much more extensive. As a result, the current management strategy includes an aggressive effort to increase woodland cover through government funded planting programs. In California, on the other hand, significant losses of oak woodlands have only occurred in the last two centuries and on a percentage basis, have been far less. Current management focuses on conserving existing oak woodlands through programs of research and education. Hopefully, in both California and Britain these efforts will be successful and help ensure that oak woodlands are sustained and even expanded, so that future generations will have the opportunity to use and appreciate them.

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McCreary, Douglas; Kerr, Gary 2002. A comparison of the history and management of oak woodlands in Britain and California. In: Standiford, Richard B., et al, tech. editor. Proceedings of the Fifth Symposium on Oak Woodlands: Oaks in California''s Challenging Landscape. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-184, Albany, CA: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture: 529-539

 


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