Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern Research Station
Help
 

Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

View PDF (670 KB bytes)

Title: Monitoring California's hardwood rangelands using remotely sensed data

Author: Fischer, Chris S.; Levien, Lisa M.;

Date: 2002

Source: In: Standiford, Richard B., et al, tech. editor. Proceedings of the Fifth Symposium on Oak Woodlands: Oaks in California's Challenging Landscape. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-184, Albany, CA: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture: 603-615

Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: As human and natural forces continue to alter the hardwood landscape, resource agencies, county planners and local interest groups find it increasingly important to monitor and assess these alterations. The California Land Cover Mapping and Monitoring Program (LCMMP), a cooperative program between the USDA Forest Service and the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, is addressing statewide long-term monitoring strategies using Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) satellite imagery. The LCMMP creates seamless vegetation and monitoring data across California's landscape for regional assessment across all ownerships and vegetation types. This paper focuses on the hardwood rangeland region from Shasta County in the north to Kern County in the south, extending from 300 to 5,000 feet in elevation. Results indicate that most of the hardwoods did not undergo change between 1991 and 1996. However, large change did occur in concentrated areas from wildfire, harvest and development. Regeneration of hardwoods was also detected. The LCMMP directly addresses CDF's need for a long-term monitoring strategy to inform discussion of issues centered on California's hardwood rangelands. CDF now has the ability to identify trends in hardwood rangeland structure, health, resource use and other factors that affect long-term viability across large regions. The LCMMP provides critical information on the impacts management decisions and natural forces have on the environment. This information includes the actual location and extent of change, three levels of vegetation cover increase and decrease and the cause of change. Knowing the location and extent of vegetation change provides a picture of the distribution and concentration of change areas. Levels of change give an indication of vegetation removal, vigor or health. Understanding what is causing these changes creates an awareness of the impacts change agents have on the landscape. This information is useful to assess the effectiveness of existing policies, programs, management activities and regulations, and to develop alternatives as needed (e.g., county voluntary guidelines for oak woodland management).

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

XML: View XML

Citation:


Fischer, Chris S.; Levien, Lisa M. 2002. Monitoring California''s hardwood rangelands using remotely sensed data. In: Standiford, Richard B., et al, tech. editor. Proceedings of the Fifth Symposium on Oak Woodlands: Oaks in California''s Challenging Landscape. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-184, Albany, CA: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture: 603-615

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.