Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern Research Station
Help
 

Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

View PDF (260 KB bytes)

Title: Phytophthora ramorum and sudden oak death in California: III. preliminary studies in pathogen genetics

Author: Garbelotto, Matteo; Rizzo, David M.; Hayden, Katie; Meija-Chang, Monica; Davidson, Jennifer M.; Tjosvold, Steven;

Date: 2002

Source: In: Standiford, Richard B., et al, tech. editor. Proceedings of the Fifth Symposium on Oak Woodlands: Oaks in California's Challenging Landscape. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-184, Albany, CA: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture: 765-774

Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Sudden oak death (SOD) has been shown to be caused by a new species of Phytophthora, P. ramorum. A basic understanding of the genetics of P. ramorum is critical to any management strategy. We have initiated a number of studies to examine species concepts, population biology and mating behavior of the pathogen. Based on a number of morphological features (e.g., a combination of deciduous sporangia and chlamydospores), the P. ramorum does not match any of the currently described species of Phytophthora. Sequences of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of nuclear ribosomal DNA were identical for isolates from Lithocarpus densiflorus, Quercus spp., Rhododendron sp., Vaccinium ovatum, Umbellularia californica, and Aesculus californica. The sequences were also identical to a recently described species from Europe, P. ramorum. Based on ITS sequences, the closest species to P. ramorum is P. lateralis; ITS sequences between the two species differ by 12 nucleotides. We are now examining the population structure of P. ramorum using amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs) to determine variability within pathogen populations. This information will provide insights into whether P. ramorum is an exotic pathogen and whether sexual recombination is taking place in California populations. Finally, the use of genetic data allows for the development of species specific diagnostic probes. PCR primers based on the ITS region have been used to facilitate the rapid identification of the pathogen from plant tissue.

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

XML: View XML

Citation:


Garbelotto, Matteo; Rizzo, David M.; Hayden, Katie; Meija-Chang, Monica; Davidson, Jennifer M.; Tjosvold, Steven 2002. Phytophthora ramorum and sudden oak death in California: III. preliminary studies in pathogen genetics. In: Standiford, Richard B., et al, tech. editor. Proceedings of the Fifth Symposium on Oak Woodlands: Oaks in California''s Challenging Landscape. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-184, Albany, CA: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture: 765-774

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.