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Title: Remote Sensing of Saltcedar Biological Control Effectiveness

Author: Carruthers, Ray; Anderson, Gerald; DeLoach, Jack; Knight, Jeff; Ge, Shaokui; Gong, Peng;

Date: 2006

Source: In: Aguirre-Bravo, C.; Pellicane, Patrick J.; Burns, Denver P.; and Draggan, Sidney, Eds. 2006. Monitoring Science and Technology Symposium: Unifying Knowledge for Sustainability in the Western Hemisphere Proceedings RMRS-P-42CD. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 50-56

Publication Series: Proceedings (P)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Saltcedar (Tamarix spp.) is a major invasive weed found throughout the Western United States and Mexico. Introduced into North America in the 1800s, this shrub to small tree, now infests many riparian areas where it displaces native vegetation, increases fire hazards, uses extensive amounts of water, increases flooding during high water events and thus has caused extensive damage to urban, agricultural and natural areas. In 2001, scientists from the United States Department of Agriculture released a Chinese leaf beetle (Diorhabda elongata) into test areas in six states to initiate and evaluate a new biological control program for saltcedar. A combination of ground-based sampling and remote sensing has been used to monitor impacts caused by this biological control program. Both color aerial photography and hyperspectral remote sensing were used to successfully classify and quantify saltcedar populations and the effectiveness of the biological control program, including beetle spread and defoliation within monotypic stands of saltcedar and in areas where saltcedar is mixed with native vegetation.

Keywords: monitoring, assessment, sustainability, Western Hemisphere, sustainable management, ecosystem resources, saltcedar, Tamarix spp.

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Citation:


Carruthers, Ray; Anderson, Gerald; DeLoach, Jack; Knight, Jeff; Ge, Shaokui; Gong, Peng 2006. Remote Sensing of Saltcedar Biological Control Effectiveness. In: Aguirre-Bravo, C.; Pellicane, Patrick J.; Burns, Denver P.; and Draggan, Sidney, Eds. 2006. Monitoring Science and Technology Symposium: Unifying Knowledge for Sustainability in the Western Hemisphere Proceedings RMRS-P-42CD. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 50-56

 


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