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Title: Monitoring Insects to Maintain Biodiversity in Ogawa Forest Reserve

Author: Makino, S.; Inoue, T.; Hamaguchi, K.; Okabe, K.; Okochi, I.; Tanaka, H.; Goto, H.; Hasegawa, M.; Sueyoshi, M.;

Date: 2006

Source: In: Aguirre-Bravo, C.; Pellicane, Patrick J.; Burns, Denver P.; and Draggan, Sidney, Eds. 2006. Monitoring Science and Technology Symposium: Unifying Knowledge for Sustainability in the Western Hemisphere Proceedings RMRS-P-42CD. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 164-167

Publication Series: Proceedings (P)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: The results of a biodiversity monitoring program conducted in the Ogawa Forest Reserve and its vicinity, situated in a temperate region of Japan, identified three different patterns for species richness. Forests of the region are characterized by a mosaic of secondary deciduous stands of various ages scattered among plantations of conifers. The three different types of change in species richness observed in response to the stand age are as follows: 1. Type I (butterflies, tube-renting bees and wasps, hoverflies, fruit flies, and longicorn beetles), the species diversity was highest in open areas, just after clear cutting, decreasing with the stand age; 2. Type II (mites associated with mushrooms), older stands showed greater diversity than younger stands; and, 3. Type III (moths, oribatid mites, collembolas, carabid beetles, and ants), the number of species did not change greatly with the stand age, though ordination analysis revealed that there was variation in species compositions. These results indicate that combinations of stands of different ages, or heterogeneously arranged stands, can contribute to the maintenance of insect biodiversity at the landscape level.

Keywords: monitoring, assessment, sustainability, Western Hemisphere, sustainable management, ecosystem resources, biodiversity monitoring program, Ogawa Forest Reserve

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Makino, S.; Inoue, T.; Hamaguchi, K.; Okabe, K.; Okochi, I.; Tanaka, H.; Goto, H.; Hasegawa, M.; Sueyoshi, M. 2006. Monitoring Insects to Maintain Biodiversity in Ogawa Forest Reserve. In: Aguirre-Bravo, C.; Pellicane, Patrick J.; Burns, Denver P.; and Draggan, Sidney, Eds. 2006. Monitoring Science and Technology Symposium: Unifying Knowledge for Sustainability in the Western Hemisphere Proceedings RMRS-P-42CD. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 164-167

 


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