Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern Research Station
Help
 

Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

View PDF (210 K bytes)

Title: The Resource Buffer Theory: Connecting the Dots from Conservation to Sustainability

Author: Black, Peter E.;

Date: 2006

Source: In: Aguirre-Bravo, C.; Pellicane, Patrick J.; Burns, Denver P.; and Draggan, Sidney, Eds. 2006. Monitoring Science and Technology Symposium: Unifying Knowledge for Sustainability in the Western Hemisphere Proceedings RMRS-P-42CD. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 385-390

Publication Series: Proceedings (P)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Review of conservation history and scientific developments helps us understand relationships between humans, environment, and sustainability. Applying “conservation” to natural resources and practical resource management occurred early in the Twentieth Century; practical economic definitions of conservation and natural resource followed. Resource surpluses underpin the luxury of conservation in which we currently bask. We are not paying attention to the fact that accumulated natural science discoveries about wide-ranging resource distribution -- so specialized that many scientists are unaware of each others’ works -- are remarkably alike. The pattern -- the Resource Buffer Theory -- demands recognition, understanding, and emulation to ensure humankind’s survival. Buffers are vast amounts of resources that are as essential to species survival as are the few units of the resource utilized by individuals; despite their vastness, they often display delicate limits. The terrestrial resource buffers to which we have access and on which we depend are Hardin’s global commons. Maintaining a large biodiversity buffer is paramount. The distribution of carbon -- the stuff of life and a critical linkage between the hydro- and biospheres -- contradicts the pattern, indicative of Planet Earth’s overpopulation. Consequent global change events are signaling us that humankind’s oblivious violation of the ubiquitous environmental pattern provides an unparalleled challenge to our survival. Faced with the imperative of sustainability, we need to connect the dots, to control the Earth’s human population and activities including resource use and waste, and to under-stand and thereby proactively emulate the Resource Buffer Theory in our natural re-sources management policies and practices.

Keywords: monitoring, assessment, sustainability, Western Hemisphere, sustainable management, ecosystem resources, Resource Buffer Theory

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
  • You may send email to rmrspubrequest@fs.fed.us to request a hard copy of this publication. (Please specify exactly which publication you are requesting and your mailing address.)

XML: View XML

Citation:


Black, Peter E. 2006. The Resource Buffer Theory: Connecting the Dots from Conservation to Sustainability. In: Aguirre-Bravo, C.; Pellicane, Patrick J.; Burns, Denver P.; and Draggan, Sidney, Eds. 2006. Monitoring Science and Technology Symposium: Unifying Knowledge for Sustainability in the Western Hemisphere Proceedings RMRS-P-42CD. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 385-390

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.