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Title: Science, Communities, and Decision Making: How Can We Learn to Dance with Many Partners?

Author: Vasseur, Liette;

Date: 2006

Source: In: Aguirre-Bravo, C.; Pellicane, Patrick J.; Burns, Denver P.; and Draggan, Sidney, Eds. 2006. Monitoring Science and Technology Symposium: Unifying Knowledge for Sustainability in the Western Hemisphere Proceedings RMRS-P-42CD. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 492-497

Publication Series: Proceedings (P)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Ecosystem management, also called integrated management can be defined as integrated careful and skilful use, development, and protection of ecosystems using ecological, economic, social and managerial principles to sustain ecosystem integrity and desired conditions, uses, products, values, and services over the long term. Although ecosystem or conservation management issues can have global, regional or trans-boundary impacts, most activities need to be focused at the sub-regional and community level to be effective. The basic concept is that the community is the most efficient unit for change in conservation management. The main challenge is to first understand these concepts and then acquire the knowledge to sustain, use, and protect natural ecosystems in order to reach a more integrated ecological, economic, and social development. In addition, community involvement can be limited because of their level of education, capacity building, and potential for actions. Communities that have data and the tools usually feel more empowered and tend to be able to deal with issues in a more effective manner than in communities where capacity and tools are non-existent. Monitoring is certainly one of the greatest steps whereby communities feel that they can contribute, learn, and enhance awareness on very specific issues. This is where it is important to develop our science in assessing sustainability in our communities. Such capacity building can help communities increase sustainability and thus influence decision making for the benefit of all members. Partnership building between public, academic, private and community constituencies can help improve knowledge and develop decision making tools for greater sustainability. Through a regional example of the southern Gulf of St Lawrence, the discussion will include lessons learned and the challenges that face communities, decision makers, private and academic sectors in promoting sustainability and the possible actions that can be taken to improve awareness and decision making.

Keywords: monitoring, assessment, sustainability, Western Hemisphere, sustainable management, ecosystem resources, ecosystem management, integrated management

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Vasseur, Liette 2006. Science, Communities, and Decision Making: How Can We Learn to Dance with Many Partners?. In: Aguirre-Bravo, C.; Pellicane, Patrick J.; Burns, Denver P.; and Draggan, Sidney, Eds. 2006. Monitoring Science and Technology Symposium: Unifying Knowledge for Sustainability in the Western Hemisphere Proceedings RMRS-P-42CD. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 492-497

 


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