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Title: AFLP analysis of Phytophthora nemorosa and P. pseudosyringae genetic structure in North America

Author: Linzer, Rachel; Rizzo, David; Garbelotto, Matteo;

Date: 2006

Source: In: Frankel, Susan J.; Shea, Patrick J.; and Haverty, Michael I., tech. coords. Proceedings of the sudden oak death second science symposium: the state of our knowledge. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-196. Albany, CA: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture: 149-151

Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: In California and Oregon, Phytophthora ramorum has an overlapping host and geographic range with two newly described homothallic Phytophthora species, P. nemorosa and P. pseudosyringae. P. nemorosa alone causes symptoms similar to those of P. ramorum, including lethal tanoak cankers, and P. pseudosyringae is associated with oak decline in Europe. However, epidemiological observations, namely broader geographic distribution and reduced virulence, suggest P. nemorosa and P. pseudosyringae are endemic in this region, while P. ramorum is hypothesized to have been introduced. Though molecular evidence suggests that P. nemorosa and P. pseudosyringae are each other’s closest known relatives, both are rather distantly related to P. ramorum. Little is known about the characteristics of these newly described forest pathogens; however, the two putative endemic Phytophthora species can apparently share the same niche as P. ramorum and may affect P. ramorum disease epidemiology. Understanding their genetic structure, then, may contribute to understanding the range of potential interactions and outcomes during infection by these Phytophthora species. Our aim is a preliminary assessment of the genetic structure of P. nemorosa and P. pseudosyringae in western North America using Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) genetic markers.

Keywords: California, endemic, forest Phytophthora species, genetic diversity, homothallic

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Linzer, Rachel; Rizzo, David; Garbelotto, Matteo 2006. AFLP analysis of Phytophthora nemorosa and P. pseudosyringae genetic structure in North America. In: Frankel, Susan J.; Shea, Patrick J.; and Haverty, Michael I., tech. coords. Proceedings of the sudden oak death second science symposium: the state of our knowledge. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-196. Albany, CA: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture: 149-151

 


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