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Title: The importance of humans in the dispersal and spread of Phytophthora ramorum at local, landscape, and regional scales

Author: Cushman, J. Hall; Meentemeyer, Ross;

Date: 2006

Source: In: Frankel, Susan J.; Shea, Patrick J.; and Haverty, Michael I., tech. coords. Proceedings of the sudden oak death second science symposium: the state of our knowledge. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-196. Albany, CA: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture: 161-163

Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Determining how Phytophthora ramorum is dispersed across the landscape is critical for understanding the ecology and epidemiology of this influential pathogen. To date, researchers have shown that abiotic factors – such as rain-splash, wind-blown rain and down-stream transport of inoculum – are critical mechanisms for the dispersal of this pathogen. In contrast, little research has focused on the potential for human dispersal of P. ramorum, although work on other pathogens – such as P. lateralis attacking Port Orford cedar – suggests that humans can play an influential role in disease spread. Here, we summarize results from a study conducted in Sonoma County that addresses three research questions examining the importance of human dispersal at the local, landscape and regional scales: 1) Is P. ramorum more frequently found in soil along hiking trails than in soil off trail? 2) Do areas visited intensively by humans have a greater proportion of hosts showing symptoms of infection by P. ramorum than areas visited less frequently? and 3) Do wildlands surrounded by dense human populations have greater levels of infection by P. ramorum than areas surrounded by less dense populations?

Keywords: plant disease spread, human dispersal, effects of recreation

Publication Notes:

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Cushman, J. Hall; Meentemeyer, Ross 2006. The importance of humans in the dispersal and spread of Phytophthora ramorum at local, landscape, and regional scales. In: Frankel, Susan J.; Shea, Patrick J.; and Haverty, Michael I., tech. coords. Proceedings of the sudden oak death second science symposium: the state of our knowledge. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-196. Albany, CA: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture: 161-163

 


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