Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern Research Station
Help
 

Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

View PDF (280 K bytes)

Title: Revegetation Strategies and Technologies for Restoration of Aridic Saltcedar (Tamarix spp.) Infestation Sites

Author: Lair, Kenneth D.;

Date: 2006

Source: In: Riley, L.E.; Dumroese, R.K.; Landis, T.D., tech. coords. 2006. National Proceedings: Forest and Conservation Nursery Associations - 2005. Proc. RMRS-P-43. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 10-20

Publication Series: Proceedings (P)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Critical knowledge gaps exist regarding vegetative recovery in aridic, monotypic saltcedar (Tamarix spp.) stands with no desirable understory plants. Formulation of revegetation strategies that provide site stabilization, resistance to further saltcedar and secondary weed infestation, and acceptable habitat values for affected wildlife species becomes particularly problematic in monotypic saltcedar stands under biological, fire, and herbicidal (that is, nonmechanical) control scenarios. Amount and density of standing biomass (live and dead) remaining after control pose limitations in relation to seeding and outplanting techniques, seed interception in aerial (broadcast) applications, and seedbed preparation methods. Undisturbed soil surfaces impacted by saltcedar leaf litter accumulation, salinity, hummocky micro relief, and nutrient limitations restrict potential for successful revegetation. Long duration of saltcedar occupation may deplete desirable microbial communities, particularly arbuscular (endo)mycorrhizae symbiotic and host-specific to native revegetation species. Selected results of innovative revegetation strategies at study sites on the Rio Grande and the Colorado River are discussed. Technical approaches include: 1) soil surface and rhizosphere manipulation methods to facilitate removal of standing dead biomass, increase precipitation capture, improve soil moisture retention, and create microsites exhibiting lower salinity and increased protection from environmental extremes for improved seed germination; 2) salinity remediation using HydraHume™; 3) seeding methodologies, including use of seed coating techniques; and 4) mycorrhizal inoculation methods.

Keywords: seedbed manipulation, mycorrhizal inoculation, triclopyr, mulching, Atriplex

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
  • You may send email to rmrspubrequest@fs.fed.us to request a hard copy of this publication. (Please specify exactly which publication you are requesting and your mailing address.)

XML: View XML

Citation:


Lair, Kenneth D. 2006. Revegetation Strategies and Technologies for Restoration of Aridic Saltcedar (Tamarix spp.) Infestation Sites. In: Riley, L.E.; Dumroese, R.K.; Landis, T.D., tech. coords. 2006. National Proceedings: Forest and Conservation Nursery Associations - 2005. Proc. RMRS-P-43. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 10-20

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.