Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern Research Station
Help
 

Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

View PDF (180 KB bytes)

Title: Transect studies on pine litter organic matter: decomposition and chemical properties of upper soil layers in Polish forests

Author: Breymeyer, Alicja; Degorski, Marek; Reed, David;

Date: 1998

Source: In: Bytnerowicz, Andrzej; Arbaugh, Michael J.; Schilling, Susan L., tech. coords. Proceedings of the international symposium on air pollution and climate change effects on forest ecosystems. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-166. Albany, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station: 179-185

Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: The relationship between litter decomposition rate, some chemical properties of upper soil layers (iron, manganese, zinc, copper, lead, mercury, nickel, chrome in humus-mineral horizon-A), and litter (the same eight elements in needle litter fraction) in pine forests of Poland was studied. Heavy metal content in organic-mineral horizon of soils was highly correlated with needle decomposition rate for copper (correlation coefficient 0.901), zinc (corr. coeff. 0.901), nickel (corr. coeff. 0.834), and iron (corr. coeff. 0.850). Heavy metal content in needle litter was highly correlated with needle decomposition rate (iron--corr. coeff. 0.83; zinc--0.80; lead--0.82; nickel--0.89), and with mixed litter decomposition rate (iron--corr. coeff. 0.71; zinc--0.66; lead--0.68; nickel--0.72). Significant correlations were not found between the rate of decomposition of wood or cones and their content of metals, except for chromium. When comparing decomposition rates with degree of litter pollution, it was shown that in the case of needle decomposition for six significant correlations, two were positive; in the case of mixed litter decomposition for five significant correlations, two were positive. In both cases decomposition reacted positively to the presence of iron and lead. When comparing decomposition rates with the degree of soil pollution, it was shown that in the case of needle decomposition, five significant correlations were positive; in the case of mixed litter decomposition, only one significant correlation was positive.

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

XML: View XML

Citation:


Breymeyer, Alicja; Degorski, Marek; Reed, David 1998. Transect studies on pine litter organic matter: decomposition and chemical properties of upper soil layers in Polish forests. In: Bytnerowicz, Andrzej; Arbaugh, Michael J.; Schilling, Susan L., tech. coords. Proceedings of the international symposium on air pollution and climate change effects on forest ecosystems. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-166. Albany, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station: 179-185

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.