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Title: Effect of ozone exposure on seasonal gas exchange of five western conifers

Author: Grulke, Nancy E.; Miller, Paul R.; Leininger, Theodor D.;

Date: 1998

Source: In: Bytnerowicz, Andrzej; Arbaugh, Michael J.; Schilling, Susan L., tech. coords. Proceedings of the international symposium on air pollution and climate change effects on forest ecosystems. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-166. Albany, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station: 229-238

Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Five species of western conifers (Pinus ponderosa, Abies concolor, Pseudotsuga menziesii, Abies lasiocarpa, and Picea engelmannii) were exposed, in two standard open-top exposure chambers per treatment, to charcoal-filtered air and a simulated diurnal ozone exposure profile (120 d sum of 136 ppm-h) to test their relative sensitivity. CO2 exchange rate (CER), stomatal conductance (gs), and total leaf nitrogen of current year foliage were measured at 1-month intervals. P. ponderosa was the most adversely affected by ozone, based on reductions in mid- and late season CER under saturating light (1.18 vs. 2.17 μmol CO2 m-2 s-1), lower light compensation point (43 vs. 33 μmol quanta m-2 s-1), and lower CER at a given gs value. P. menziesii showed reduced CER and higher gs by the end of the experimental ozone exposure. A. concolor and P. engelmannii showed no reduction in CO2 uptake and no clear effects of ozone exposure on gs. Adverse ozone effects on biomass or growth in the year of exposure were seen for A. lasiocarpa and P. ponderosa, whereas A. concolor, P. engelmanii and P. menziesii showed adverse effects only in the year after exposure. Few consistent patterns in which plant component was affected were found, either in the year of exposure or the year after exposure. An analysis of the number of chambers required or the difference between treatment means necessary to obtain statistical significance with the population variance measure was an important result.

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Grulke, Nancy E.; Miller, Paul R.; Leininger, Theodor D. 1998. Effect of ozone exposure on seasonal gas exchange of five western conifers. In: Bytnerowicz, Andrzej; Arbaugh, Michael J.; Schilling, Susan L., tech. coords. Proceedings of the international symposium on air pollution and climate change effects on forest ecosystems. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-166. Albany, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station: 229-238

 


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