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Publication Information

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Title: Forest health status in Russia

Author: Alexeyev, Vladislav A.;

Date: 1998

Source: In: Bytnerowicz, Andrzej; Arbaugh, Michael J.; Schilling, Susan L., tech. coords. Proceedings of the international symposium on air pollution and climate change effects on forest ecosystems. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-166. Albany, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station: 267-270

Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: About 886.5 Mha in Russia is occupied by forests, including 763.5 Mha of tree stands and 123 Mha of nonstocked lands. The Russian forests comprise about 22 percent of the earth's forest area or 43 percent of the earth's temperate and boreal forests. Main forest-forming species are Larix sp. (32 percent of the growing stock), Pinus sylvestris (20 percent), Picea sp. (15 percent), Betula sp. (13 percent), Pinus sibirica (10 percent), Populus tremula (5 percent), Abies sp. (3 percent), Quercus sp. (1 percent) and other species (1 percent). About one-third of tree stands and two-thirds of forest ecosystems in Russia are disturbed by natural and anthropogenic stresses. Most prevalent are natural causes of disturbance (climate, aging of stands, fires, pests) that affect 200-250 Mha of forest stands. About 45 Mha of forest stands (6 percent of stocked area) are under the impact of anthropogenic influence. Atmospheric pollution is the most dangerous form of anthropogenic stress in the Russian forests.

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Alexeyev, Vladislav A. 1998. Forest health status in Russia. In: Bytnerowicz, Andrzej; Arbaugh, Michael J.; Schilling, Susan L., tech. coords. Proceedings of the international symposium on air pollution and climate change effects on forest ecosystems. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-166. Albany, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station: 267-270

 


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