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Publication Information

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Title: Dynamics of forest health status in Slovakia from 1987 to 1994

Author: Oszlanyi, Julius;

Date: 1998

Source: In: Bytnerowicz, Andrzej; Arbaugh, Michael J.; Schilling, Susan L., tech. coords. Proceedings of the international symposium on air pollution and climate change effects on forest ecosystems. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-166. Albany, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station: 293-298

Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Slovakia is a mountainous and forested country (40.6 percent forest cover) in central Europe and has a large variety of vegetation zones, forest types, and a rich diversity of forest tree species. The most important tree species are beech (Fagus sylvatica L.), Norway spruce (Picea abies Karst.), oak species (Quercus sp.), Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.), silver fir (Abies alba Mill.), European hornbeam (Carpinus betulus L.), European larch (Larix decidua Mill.), poplars and willows (Populus L. sp., Salix L. sp.), and other hardwood broadleaves. On the basis of results of the Forest Health Monitoring System from 1987 to 1994, the scientific information is presented for the following parameters: defoliation, discoloration, percentage of tree number in classes of damage, and percentage of salvage cut in the total annual cut. The percentage of trees in the defoliation classes 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4 were 14.7, 43.5, 36.2, 4.3, and 1.3, respectively (class 0 means healthy trees; class 4 dead trees). The discoloration classes (0, 1, 2, 3, and 4) were represented by 98.0, 1.7, 0.3, 0, and 0 percent for all tree species together. The average defoliation percentage from 1987 to 1994 decreased with time and is expected to further decrease in the following years. However, the percentage of annual salvage cut in the total annual cut increased between 1987 and 1994. Various biotic and abiotic factors influence forest health in Slovakia, such as air pollution, wind and snow, damages by beetles, sucking insects, and game. Global climate change seems to be the most important among them.

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Oszlanyi, Julius 1998. Dynamics of forest health status in Slovakia from 1987 to 1994. In: Bytnerowicz, Andrzej; Arbaugh, Michael J.; Schilling, Susan L., tech. coords. Proceedings of the international symposium on air pollution and climate change effects on forest ecosystems. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-166. Albany, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station: 293-298

 


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