Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern Research Station
Help
 

Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

View PDF (150 KB bytes)

Title: Assessing estuarine biota in southern California

Author: Lafferty, Kevin D.;

Date: 2005

Source: In: Kus, Barbara E., and Beyers, Jan L., technical coordinators. Planning for Biodiversity: Bringing Research and Management Together. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-195. Albany, CA: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture: 1-15

Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: In southern California, most estuarine wetlands are gone, and what little habitat remains is degraded. For this reason, it is often of interest to assess the condition of estuaries over time, such as when determining the success of a restoration project. To identify impacts or opportunities for restoration, we also may want to know how a particular estuary, or area within an estuary, compares with neighboring areas. Comparisons among wetlands require knowledge of different estuary types. The seven types of estuaries described in this paper can be easily grouped into two functional types, fully tidal and seasonally tidal, based on a simple biotic index: presence of horn snails. A description of the distribution, diversity, and abundance of organisms in estuaries is one way to assess resources, determine the success of a habitat restoration, and compare estuaries to evaluate the biotic consequences of degradation. In this review, I summarize techniques that may be useful for managers charged with biotic inventory and monitoring, emphasizing techniques to categorize wetlands and quantify plants, invertebrates, fishes, birds, and trematode parasites.

Keywords: bird, estuary, fish, indicator, invertebrate, trematode

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

XML: View XML

Citation:


Lafferty, Kevin D. 2005. Assessing estuarine biota in southern California. In: Kus, Barbara E., and Beyers, Jan L., technical coordinators. Planning for Biodiversity: Bringing Research and Management Together. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-195. Albany, CA: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture: 1-15

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.