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Title: Protecting Oregon old-growth forests from fires: how much is it worth?

Author: González-Cabán, Armando; Loomis, John; Gregory, Robin;

Date: 1995

Source: In: Chavez, Deborah J., tech. coord. Proceedings of the Second Symposium on Social Aspects and Recreation Research, February 23-25, 1994, San Diego, California. Gen. Tech. Rep PSW-GTR-156. Albany, CA: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture: 139-143

Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Current fire management policies in the USDA Forest Service includes traditional multiple uses, but these policies do not adequately incorporate non-traditional uses such as preservation of biodiversity and related nongame and endangered animals. A contingent valuation methodology was used for valuing the general public's desire to know that rare and unique ecosystems exist and will be protected from fire for current and future generations. The methodology was applied to old-growth forests and critical habitat units for the northern spotted owl in Oregon. A mail survey describing a simulated voter referendum on an Oregon old-growth fire prevention and control fund that reduces by half the number of acres of old-growth burned each year was sent to a random sample of 1,000 Oregon households. Each household was randomly assigned one of 20 alternative program cost levels ranging from $2 to $300. The mean dichotomous choice willingness to pay estimate was $90.00. By expanding the sample to Oregon's population yields, estimates ranged from $45 to $99 million for the whole State (a low of $45 to $90 per household). The resulting value per acre saved from fire under the proposed scenario is more than $24,000; and the cost per acres of old-growth protected is $28.

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González-Cabán, Armando; Loomis, John; Gregory, Robin 1995. Protecting Oregon old-growth forests from fires: how much is it worth?. In: Chavez, Deborah J., tech. coord. Proceedings of the Second Symposium on Social Aspects and Recreation Research, February 23-25, 1994, San Diego, California. Gen. Tech. Rep PSW-GTR-156. Albany, CA: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture: 139-143

 


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