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Title: Behavioral Ecology of Subterranean Termites and Implications for Control

Author: Grace, J. Kenneth;

Date: 1991

Source: In: Haverty, Michael I.; Wilcox, W. Wayne, technical coordinators. 1991. Proceedings of the symposium on current research on wood-destroying organisms and future prospects for protecting wood in use; September 13, 1989; Bend, OR. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-128. Berkeley, CA: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture; p. 43-45

Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Subterranean termites are important structural pests in much of North America, and worldwide. Recent studies of eastern subterranean termite (Reticulitermes flavipes [Kollar]) colonies in Ontario, Canada, indicate that these colonies contain greater foraging populations and forage over larger territories than was previously thought to be the case. These results are consistent with those obtained elsewhere with Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki and Heterotermes aureus (Snyder). Implications for the development of baiting techniques for termite control are discussed, and several laboratory investigations of potential bait toxicants and insecticidal dusts are reviewed. Behavioral chemicals are also potentially useful in termite control, and bioassays with tree extractives indicate that semiochemicals affecting termite orientation offer an explanation for the observed pattern of R. flavipes infestation in street trees in Toronto.

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Grace, J. Kenneth 1991. Behavioral Ecology of Subterranean Termites and Implications for Control. In: Haverty, Michael I.; Wilcox, W. Wayne, technical coordinators. 1991. Proceedings of the symposium on current research on wood-destroying organisms and future prospects for protecting wood in use; September 13, 1989; Bend, OR. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-128. Berkeley, CA: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture; p. 43-45

 


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