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Title: Applications of Redwood Genotyping by Using Microsatellite Markers

Author: Brinegar, Chris; Bruno, Dan; Kirkbride, Ryan; Glavas, Steven; Udranszky, Ingrid;

Date: 2007

Source: In: Standiford, Richard B.; Giusti, Gregory A.; Valachovic, Yana; Zielinski, William J.; Furniss, Michael J., technical editors. 2007. Proceedings of the redwood region forest science symposium: What does the future hold? Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-194. Albany, CA: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture; p. 47-56

Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: A panel of polymorphic microsatellite markers have been developed in coast redwood (Sequoia sempervirens). Two loci in particular (Seq18D7-3 and Seq21E5) demonstrate the potential of microsatellite genotyping in the assessment of genetic diversity and inheritance in redwoods. The highly polymorphic Seq18D7-3 marker provided evidence for the planting of non-local redwood seedlings in a restored area of a state park and was used to genotype progeny from a controlled cross. A putative chloroplast microsatellite locus (Seq21E5) was shown to be paternally inherited in two controlled crosses and can therefore be used as a marker for alleles carried in pollen. Significant differences in allelic diversity were observed at the Seq21E5 locus in redwood populations with different ecological and management histories. Advantages of microsatellite analysis and its limitations (including the problem of null alleles) are discussed as well as its potential as a tool for forest management and conservation.

Keywords: genotyping, microsatellites, redwood, Sequoia, simple sequence repeats

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Brinegar, Chris; Bruno, Dan; Kirkbride, Ryan; Glavas, Steven; Udranszky, Ingrid 2007. Applications of Redwood Genotyping by Using Microsatellite Markers. In: Standiford, Richard B.; Giusti, Gregory A.; Valachovic, Yana; Zielinski, William J.; Furniss, Michael J., technical editors. 2007. Proceedings of the redwood region forest science symposium: What does the future hold? Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-194. Albany, CA: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture; p. 47-56

 


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