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Title: Role of summer prescribed fire to manage shrub-invaded grasslands

Author: Taylor, Charles A.;

Date: 2007

Source: In: Sosebee, Ronald E.; Wester, David B.; Britton, Carlton M.; McArthur, E. Durant; Kitchen, Stanley G., comps. Proceedings: Shrubland dynamics -- fire and water; 2004 August 10-12; Lubbock, TX. Proceedings RMRS-P-47. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 52-55.

Publication Series: Proceedings (P)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Prior to development of the livestock industry, both anthropogenic and natural disturbances (such as prescribed and wild fire) played key roles in shaping the different plant communities across Texas. Historically, fires occurred during all seasons of the year, but summer fires were probably more frequent due to dry conditions combined with increased lightning frequency during the summer. When fire was frequent, the upland or western divide region of the Edwards Plateau was typical of a savanna ecosystem. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of summer and winter burning and no burning (controls) on vegetation. Woody and succulent vegetation species were highly vulnerable to both summer and winter fire. Herbaceous response was species dependent; however, overall grass production was greater under a summer burning regime compared to control and winter burn treatments. Summer burning is recognized and recommended for reclamation of rangeland vegetation under appropriate conditions and levels of supervision, experience, and training. Once reclaimed with one or two summer fires, management can shift to lower risk, cool-season burns for maintenance.

Keywords: wildland shrubs, fire, water, Texas, summer and winter burning, vegetation

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Citation:


Taylor, Charles A. 2007. Role of summer prescribed fire to manage shrub-invaded grasslands. In: Sosebee, Ronald E.; Wester, David B.; Britton, Carlton M.; McArthur, E. Durant; Kitchen, Stanley G., comps. Proceedings: Shrubland dynamics -- fire and water; 2004 August 10-12; Lubbock, TX. Proceedings RMRS-P-47. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 52-55.

 


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