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Title: Effects of Shade on Blue Oak and Coast Live Oak Regeneration in California Annual Grasslands

Author: Muick, Pamela C.;

Date: 1991

Source: In: Standiford, Richard B., tech. coord. 1991. Proceedings of the symposium on oak woodlands and hardwood rangeland management; October 31 - November 2, 1990; Davis, California. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-126. Berkeley, CA: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture; p. 21-24

Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Canopy effects and annual vegetation have been shown to strongly influence oak seedling survival. From the many elements composing canopy, shade was selected for experimental manipulation. A split-plot, multifactorial experiment was designed to test whether blue oak (Quercus douglasii) and coast live oak (Q. agrifolia) could establish seedlings in annual grasslands outside of canopy influence, and if there were differences in the responses of the two species to shade and sun treatments. All herbivory was excluded from three plots. All plots were constructed outside of direct canopy influence, and the annual herbaceous vegetation was not manipulated. Even under conditions of prolonged, severe drought, blue oaks and coast live oaks were able to establish seedlings from acorns in annual grasslands. Although the initial emergence of coast live oak seedlings from acorns was greater than that of blue oak in the first year, more blue oak seedlings were alive a year later. The survivorship of both species was significantly enhanced by the shade treatment.

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Muick, Pamela C. 1991. Effects of Shade on Blue Oak and Coast Live Oak Regeneration in California Annual Grasslands. In: Standiford, Richard B., tech. coord. 1991. Proceedings of the symposium on oak woodlands and hardwood rangeland management; October 31 - November 2, 1990; Davis, California. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-126. Berkeley, CA: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture; p. 21-24

 


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