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Publication Information

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Title: Restoring recreational and residential forests

Author: Scott, Joe;

Date: 1996

Source: In: Hardy, Colin C.; Arno, Stephen F., eds. The use of fire in forest restoration. Gen. Tech. Rep. INT-GTR-341. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Intermountain Research Station. p. 44-45.

Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Several decades of fire suppression following logging around the turn-of-the-century has produced dense, evenage stands of ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) and Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii). They contrast with the original forests where frequent, low-intensity fires gave rise to open, parklike, and often uneven-age stands of ponderosa pine. Forests in current conditions are prone to insect infestations, disease outbreaks, and severe wildfires. As residential development and recreational use of this forest type continues to increase, the need for low-impact treatments for mitigating the wildfire, insect, and disease hazards likewise increases. Some forest managers have developed "ecosystem management" treatments such as thinning coupled with prescribed burning to address these concerns. However, special considerations must be made in treating high-value forest land like recreation areas and private home sites. This paper emphasizes silvicultural and harvesting concerns with some additional comments on the use of prescribed burning.

Keywords: fire ecology, fire regimes, forest restoration, ponderosa pine, Pinus ponderosa, Douglas-fir, Pseudotsuga menziesii, silvicultural, harvesting, prescribed burning

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Scott, Joe 1996. Restoring recreational and residential forests. In: Hardy, Colin C.; Arno, Stephen F., eds. The use of fire in forest restoration. Gen. Tech. Rep. INT-GTR-341. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Intermountain Research Station. p. 44-45.

 


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