Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern Research Station
Help
 

Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

View PDF (2.37 MB bytes)

Title: Biomass removal, soil compaction, and vegetation control effects on five-year growth of Douglas-fir in coastal Washington.

Author: Ares, A.; Terry, T.; Harrington, C.; Devine, W.; Peter, D.; Bailey, J.;

Date: 2007

Source: Forest Science. 53(5): 600-610

Publication Series: Scientific Journal (JRNL)

Description: Sustainable forest production requires an understanding of the effects of site disturbance on tree growth and the consequences of soil amelioration and vegetation control practices. We assessed the impacts of biomass removals at harvest, soil compaction and tillage, and vegetation control on early growth of Douglas-fir in coastal Washington. Harvest treatments included removal of commercial bole only (BO), bole only up to 5-cm top diameter (B05), total tree (TT), and total tree plus all legacy coarse woody debris (TTP). Vegetation control (VC) effects were tested in BO, while soil compaction (BO/SC) and compaction plus tillage (BO/SCT) were imposed in BO/VC. Five years after planting, biomass removal and soil compaction/tillage effects on tree growth were relatively small. At year 5, mean stem basal diameter in BO was greater than in TT, whereas mean height was similar in BO and BO/SC, but increased in BO/SCT. Control of competing vegetation markedly increased tree growth. At year 5, mean tree stem diameter at 1.3-m height (d.b.h.) and height in BO/no vegetation control (NVC) were 34 mm and 308 cm, respectively, compared to 45 mm and 357 cm in BO/VC (P <0.01). Mean relative growth rate in stem diameter for trees in BO/VC was greater than in BO/NVC in years 2-4, but this trend reversed in year 5, suggesting that tree intraspecific competition may be greater in BO/VC than in BO/NVC. Vegetation control also increased second-flushing (i.e., the flushing of set buds in late summer) in years 4 and 5. Vegetation competition effects on tree growth appeared to be related to changes in available soil water rather than to competition for nutrients.

Keywords: Long-term forest productivity, forest soils, vegetation, Pseudotsuga menziesii, soil water

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

XML: View XML

Citation:


Ares, A.; Terry, T.; Harrington, C.; Devine, W.; Peter, D.; Bailey, J. 2007. Biomass removal, soil compaction, and vegetation control effects on five-year growth of Douglas-fir in coastal Washington. Forest Science. 53(5): 600-610

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.