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Title: Conservation of forest genetic resources in the United States.

Author: St. Clair, B.; Lipow, S.; Vance-Borland, K.; Johnson, R.;

Date: 2007

Source: In: Loo, J.A.; Simpson, J.D., eds. Proceedings of the thirtieth meeting of the Canadian Tree Improvement Association Part 2 symposium: Canada's forests-enhancing productivity, protection and conservation. Natural Resource Canada: Frederiction, New Brunswick, Canada: 16-24

Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication

Description: Conservation of genetic diversity is recognized as an important requirement of sustainable forest management. Gene conservation activities include in situ conservation of native stands in reserves and ex situ conservation in seed banks, genetic tests, seed and breeding orchards, and other plantations of known identity. We present an example from Oregon and Washington of a GIS-based "gap analysis" approach to determine the spatial distribution of protected in situ genetic resources. GIS coverages showing detailed distributions of eight tree species stratified into presumably unique genetic units using seed zones or ecoregions were overlaid with coverages of reserves to determine the locations of protected populations as well as gaps in protection. The gap analysis indicated that most species appear to have sufficient genetic resources conserved in in situ reserves. This approach may be valuable elsewhere, particularly in the Eastern United States where fewer large reserves exist. Of particular note, for ex situ conservation, is a recent agreement between the USDA Forest Service National Seed Laboratory and the USDA Agricultural Research Service National Center for Genetic Resources Preservation to provide long-term storage of seed collections of valuable plant germplasm in their facility in Fort Collins, Colorado. Protection from disease and insects is another important component of gene conservation.

Keywords: gene conservation, genetic resources, gap analysis, tree improvement

Publication Notes:

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St. Clair, B.; Lipow, S.; Vance-Borland, K.; Johnson, R. 2007. Conservation of forest genetic resources in the United States. In: Loo, J.A.; Simpson, J.D., eds. Proceedings of the thirtieth meeting of the Canadian Tree Improvement Association Part 2 symposium: Canada''s forests-enhancing productivity, protection and conservation. Natural Resource Canada: Frederiction, New Brunswick, Canada: 16-24

 


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