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Title: Jute and kenaf

Author: Rowell, Roger M.; Stout, Harry P.;

Date: 2007

Source: Handbook of fiber chemistry. Boca Raton : CRC/Taylor & Francis, c2007. International fiber science and technology series ; 16: Pages 409-456

Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication

Description: Jute is the common name given to the fiber extracted from the stems of plants belonging to the genus Corchorus, family Tiliaceae. whereas kenaf is the name given to a similar fiber obtained from the stems of plants belonging to the genus Hibiscus, family Malvaceae, especially the species H. cannabinus L. Only two species of Corchorus, namely C. capsular L. and C. olitorius L., are grown commercially, although around 40 wild species are known, whereas other species of Hibiscus, particularly H. sabdariffa L. are sometimes also marketed as kenaf. These plants are examples of a number of woody- stemmed berbaceous dicotyledons grown in the tropics and subtropics. Fibers can be extracted from the bast of stems of these plants. Most of the plants cultivated for fiber are grown from seeds annually, as are jute and kenaf, but a few are grown as perennials. Jute is the most important fiber of this type, and it is probable that, in the industrial and engineering uses of textiles. jute is used more than any other single fiber. Kenaf finds use in the domestic market in many countries, but its demand in the international market is much less than that of jute, and estimates of world kenaf production are liable to be erroneous. In many marketing statistics. the production or utilization of “jute and allied fibers” is given to include all the fibers in this group. “Allied fibers” are suitable for processing on jute spinning systems.

Keywords: Plant fibers, anatomy, modulus of elasticity, color fading, weathering, composite materials, moisture, elasticity, flexure, kenaf, jute fiber, fibers, utilization, mechanical properties, deterioration, swelling, modulus of rupture, strength, durability, deterioration

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Rowell, Roger M.; Stout, Harry P. 2007. Jute and kenaf. Handbook of fiber chemistry. Boca Raton : CRC/Taylor & Francis, c2007. International fiber science and technology series ; 16: Pages 409-456

 


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