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Title: Conservation status of imperiled North American freshwater and diadromous fishes

Author: Jelks, Howard L.; Walsh, Stephen J.; Burkhead, Noel M.; Contreras-Balderas, Salvador; Diaz-Pardo, Edmundo; Hendrickson, Dean A.; Lyons, John; Mandrak, Nicholas E.; McCormick, Frank; Nelson, Joseph S.; Plantania, Steven P.; Porter, Brady A.; Renaud, Claude B.; Schmitter-Soto, Juan Jacobo; Taylor, Eric B.; Warren, Melvin L. Jr.;

Date: 2008

Source: Fisheries, Vol. 33(8): 372-407

Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication

Description: This is the third compilation of imperiled (i.e., endangered, threatened, vulnerable) plus extinct freshwater and diadromous fishes of North America prepared by the American Fisheries Society?s Endangered Species Committee. Since the last revision in 1989, imperilment of inland fishes has increased substantially. This list includes 700 extant taxa representing 133 genera and 36 families, a 92% increase over the 364 listed in 1989. The increase reflects the addition of distinct populations, previously non-imperiled fishes, and recently described or discovered taxa. Approximately 39% of described fish species of the continent are imperiled. There are 230 vulnerable, 190 threatened, and 280 endangered extant taxa, and 61 taxa presumed extinct or extirpated from nature. Of those that were imperiled in 1989, most (89%) are the same or worse in conservation status; only 6% have improved in status, and 5% were delisted for various reasons. Habitat degradation and nonindigenous species are the main threats to at-risk fishes, many of which are restricted to small ranges. Documenting the diversity and status of rare fishes is a critical step in identifying and implementing appropriate actions necessary for their protection and management.

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Jelks, Howard L.; Walsh, Stephen J.; Burkhead, Noel M.; Contreras-Balderas, Salvador; Diaz-Pardo, Edmundo; Hendrickson, Dean A.; Lyons, John; Mandrak, Nicholas E.; McCormick, Frank; Nelson, Joseph S.; Plantania, Steven P.; Porter, Brady A.; Renaud, Claude B.; Schmitter-Soto, Juan Jacobo; Taylor, Eric B.; Warren, Melvin L. Jr. 2008. Conservation status of imperiled North American freshwater and diadromous fishes. Fisheries, Vol. 33(8): 372-407

 


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