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Title: Landscape-level changes

Author: Frandsen, A. Joel;

Date: 2008

Source: In: Gottfried, Gerald J.; Shaw, John D.; Ford, Paulette L., compilers. 2008. Ecology, management, and restoration of pinon-juniper and ponderosa pine ecosystems: combined proceedings of the 2005 St. George, Utah and 2006 Albuquerque, New Mexico workshops. Proceedings RMRS-P-51. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 199-206.

Publication Series: Proceedings (P)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Since European settlement, Utah?s vegetative landscapes have changed. Like other arid states, these wildland systems were depleted and altered. Certain steps were taken through private, community, and finally public efforts, such as establishment of Forest Reserves (National Forests), to stop the slide. Conservation and management actions were taken to restore, rehabilitate and manage these landscapes. Utah has numerous examples where the productive capability of the land has been restored. Unfortunately, in this environmental era, we are again in a downward ecological spiral, and the productivity of these landscapes towards desired objectives is not being met. The action needed to stop this trend is not getting the attention to stabilize and correct the problem. The Healthy Forests Initiative and the Healthy Forests Restoration Act provide some positive steps in this direction, and the knowledge and technology are available and can be expanded upon. The challenge is: can we muster the will and support to reverse the downward spiral?

Keywords: landscape-level changes, vegetation management, forest health, invasive species, conservation, restoration, rehabilitation

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Citation:


Frandsen, A. Joel 2008. Landscape-level changes. In: Gottfried, Gerald J.; Shaw, John D.; Ford, Paulette L., compilers. 2008. Ecology, management, and restoration of pinon-juniper and ponderosa pine ecosystems: combined proceedings of the 2005 St. George, Utah and 2006 Albuquerque, New Mexico workshops. Proceedings RMRS-P-51. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 199-206.

 


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