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Title: Slow release fertilizers in bareroot nurseries

Author: Iyer, J. G.; Dobrahner, J.; Lowery, B.; Vandettey, J.;

Date: 2002

Source: In: Dumroese, R. K.; Riley, L. E.; Landis, T. D., technical coordinators. National proceedings: forest and conservation nursery associations-1999, 2000, and 2001. Proceedings RMRS-P-24. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 112-119

Publication Series: Proceedings (P)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Maintaining sufficient soil fertility in tree nurseries for good tree growth can be implemented by annually performing soil analyses and following a fertility maintenance program. Percentage recovery by trees of fertilizer applied indicates efficiency of fertilizer use. There is a wide variation in the recovery among the various fertilizer elements. Our research has shown that, of the primary nutrients, nitrogen recovery is much more variable, spanning from deficits to almost complete recovery. Low efficiency of nitrogen recovery is the usual rather than the exceptional occurrence. Soil characteristics, climatic conditions, cultural practices, fertilizer source, and fertilizer application method influence nutrient recovery. Most applied nitrogen is either recovered rather soon after application or lost from the soil-plant system. An approach to resolving the problem associated with nitrogen mobility and environmental protection has resulted in the development, testing, and use of several controlled-release or slow-release fertilizers. Slow-release fertilizers have not been widely used in bare root tree seedling nurseries and Christmas tree production. The lack of research in the area causes growers to sometimes guess at fertilizer applications, which can result in economic losses and environmental degradation. Several kinds of slow-release fertilizers are being manufactured and used in the turf industry rather successfully.

Keywords: nitrogen balance, cation balance, anion balance, nicronutrients, leachate, groundwater contamination

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Iyer, J. G.; Dobrahner, J.; Lowery, B.; Vandettey, J. 2002. Slow release fertilizers in bareroot nurseries. In: Dumroese, R. K.; Riley, L. E.; Landis, T. D., technical coordinators. National proceedings: forest and conservation nursery associations-1999, 2000, and 2001. Proceedings RMRS-P-24. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 112-119

 


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