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Title: Terrestrial Birds and Conservation Priorities in Baja California Peninsula

Author: Rodriguez-Estrella, Ricardo;

Date: 2005

Source: In: Ralph, C. John; Rich, Terrell D., editors 2005. Bird Conservation Implementation and Integration in the Americas: Proceedings of the Third International Partners in Flight Conference. 2002 March 20-24; Asilomar, California, Volume 1 Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-191. Albany, CA: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station: p. 115-120

Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: The Baja California peninsula has been categorized as an Endemic Bird Area of the world and it is an important wintering area for a number of aquatic, wading and migratory landbird species. It is an important area for conservation of bird diversity in northwestern México. In spite of this importance, only few, scattered studies have been done on the ecology and biology of bird species, and almost no studies exist for priority relevant species such as endemics, threatened and other key species. The diversity of habitats and climates permits the great resident landbird species richness throughout the Peninsula, and also explains the presence of an important number of landbird migrant species. Approximately 140 resident and 65 migrant landbird species have been recorded for Baja California state (BCN) and 120 resident and 55 landbird migrant species for Baja California Sur state (BCS). Three terrestrial endemics have been recognized for BCN and four endemics for BCS. Sierra de la Laguna at the southern tip of the Peninsula contains an important number of endemic taxa at the subspecies level (N = 11). Most migrant species use oases of southern Baja as stopovers and Sierra de la Laguna as a final overwintering area. Twenty taxa are listed as threatened or endangered in BCN and two species extinct, the California Condor (Gymnogyps californianus) and the Guadalupe caracara (Polyborus lutosus). Ten raptors and 10 Passeriformes (seven from Guadalupe island) are in threatened categories. In BCS, 32 taxa are also listed. One extinct species, 11 raptors and 20 Passeriformes (14 from Sierra de la Laguna). The most important areas for landbird conservation in the Peninsula are the oak and pine-oak forests of Sierra de la Laguna, Sierra San Pedro Mártir and Sierra de Juárez; Valle de Los Cirios; Sierra de la Giganta; and Bahía Magdalena and the series of oases throughout the Peninsula. Critical areas for conservation are the scattered oases, particularly those of San Ignacio, Sierra de la Giganta, La PurĂ­sima, the ComondĂșes, San José del Cabo and Santiago. Threats for terrestrial birds are due to habitat fragmentation, the use of pesticides in agriculture areas and big development projects such as the Nautical Ladder that will have impacts at the regional level on the biodiversity. Proposals for research and conservation action priorities are given for the conservation of birds and their habitats throughout the Peninsula of Baja California.

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Rodriguez-Estrella, Ricardo 2005. Terrestrial Birds and Conservation Priorities in Baja California Peninsula. In: Ralph, C. John; Rich, Terrell D., editors 2005. Bird Conservation Implementation and Integration in the Americas: Proceedings of the Third International Partners in Flight Conference. 2002 March 20-24; Asilomar, California, Volume 1 Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-191. Albany, CA: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station: p. 115-120

 


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