Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern Research Station
Help
 

Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

View PDF (542 KB bytes)

Title: Design of a Monitoring Program for Northern Spotted Owls

Author: Bart, Jonathan; Robson, Douglas S.;

Date: 1995

Source: In: Ralph, C. John; Sauer, John R.; Droege, Sam, technical editors. 1995. Monitoring bird populations by point counts. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-149. Albany, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station: p. 75-82

Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: This paper discusses methods for estimating population trends of Northern Spotted Owls (Strix occidentalis caurina) based on point counts. Although the monitoring program will have five distinct components, attention here is restricted to one of these: roadside surveys of territorial birds. Analyses of Breeding Bird Survey data and computer simulations were used to develop recommendations for design of the roadside surveys. An approach known as "lattice sampling," in which some stations are visited annually and other stations are visited less often, may offer some advantages over the more common practice in wildlife surveys of visiting every station once per year. The analyses suggest that an adequate sample of the roadside surveys could be obtained with less than one person-year of effort per year per state, an expenditure well within current efforts for surveying Northern Spotted Owls, and that a minimum of 8 years, and probably at least 10 years of survey data will be required to obtain reliable estimates of long-term population trends.

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

XML: View XML

Citation:


Bart, Jonathan; Robson, Douglas S. 1995. Design of a Monitoring Program for Northern Spotted Owls. In: Ralph, C. John; Sauer, John R.; Droege, Sam, technical editors. 1995. Monitoring bird populations by point counts. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-149. Albany, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station: p. 75-82

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.