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Title: Problems associated with pooling mark-recapture data prior to estimating stopover length for migratory passerines

Author: Morris, Sara R.; Turner, Erica M.; Liebner, David A.; Larracuente, Amanda M.; Sheets, H. David;

Date: 2005

Source: In: Ralph, C. John; Rich, Terrell D., editors 2005. Bird Conservation Implementation and Integration in the Americas: Proceedings of the Third International Partners in Flight Conference. 2002 March 20-24; Asilomar, California, Volume 2 Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-191. Albany, CA: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station: p. 673-679

Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: One measure of the importance of a stopover site is the length of time that migrants spend at an area, however measuring the time birds spend at a stopover site has proven difficult. Most banding studies have presented only minimum length of stopover, based on the difference between initial capture and final recapture of birds that are captured more than once. Cormack-Jolly-Seber (CJS) models have used multiple recaptures to estimate stopover length by migrants, and recently a new model (Stopover Duration Analysis, SODA) incorporating recruitment estimates has been suggested. Using banding data from Red-eyed Vireos (Vireo olivaceous), American Redstarts (Setophaga ruticilla), and Northern Waterthrushes (Seiurus noveboracensis) captured during fall migration on Appledore Island, Maine, during 1999 and 2000, we evaluated stopover estimates from minimum stopover and SODA methods. In particular, we investigated the effects of pooling data for analysis on stopover estimates. Results from our banding data and model simulations suggest that pooling may result in biased stopover estimates, by increasing estimates with increased pooling interval sizes. Furthermore, pooling may also increase the variance in the estimate. Thus pooling should be used with caution and avoided when possible.

Keywords: mark-recapture, migratory passerines, pooling, stopover length

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Morris, Sara R.; Turner, Erica M.; Liebner, David A.; Larracuente, Amanda M.; Sheets, H. David 2005. Problems associated with pooling mark-recapture data prior to estimating stopover length for migratory passerines. In: Ralph, C. John; Rich, Terrell D., editors 2005. Bird Conservation Implementation and Integration in the Americas: Proceedings of the Third International Partners in Flight Conference. 2002 March 20-24; Asilomar, California, Volume 2 Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-191. Albany, CA: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station: p. 673-679

 


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