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Title: Temperate non-breeding surveys - a key to shorebird conservation

Author: Thomas, Sue;

Date: 2005

Source: In: Ralph, C. John; Rich, Terrell D., editors 2005. Bird Conservation Implementation and Integration in the Americas: Proceedings of the Third International Partners in Flight Conference. 2002 March 20-24; Asilomar, California, Volume 2 Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-191. Albany, CA: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station: p. 918-923

Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Completion of the United States and Canadian shorebird conservation plans recently identified and prioritized shorebird monitoring, management, and conservation needs in the Western Hemisphere. We present an emerging approach to monitor shorebird use of temperate non-breeding areas under the Program for Regional and International Shorebird Monitoring (PRISM). This program provides a single, comprehensive blueprint for implementing the monitoring component of both the U.S. and Canadian plans. The main goals of PRISM are to estimate the size of breeding populations, monitor population trends, evaluate the magnitude of use of stopover locations, and assist local managers with conservation goals. The primary goal of temperate non-breeding surveys is to produce an accurate estimate of the average number of shorebirds using stopover sites during the spring and fall migration in Canada and the United States. At a regional level, this effort will provide local or regional resource managers with quantitative information on shorebird use of key locations allowing them to more effectively manage and conserve shorebirds at the local and flyway scale. In coordination with the Biological Resources Division, US Geological Service, the Pacific Region of the US Fish and Wildlife Service is identifying and evaluating a network of monitoring sites along the Oregon Coast. This includes prioritizing focal species, evaluating potential biases in conducting surveys, defining survey methodology, and developing a strategy to coordinate volunteer efforts. This program seeks to build upon and advance citizen science initiatives such as the International Shorebird Survey, the Maritimes Shorebird Survey in the Atlantic Provinces of Canada, and the Western Shorebird Survey.

Keywords: conservation, migration, monitoring, shorebird, surveys, temperate

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Thomas, Sue 2005. Temperate non-breeding surveys - a key to shorebird conservation. In: Ralph, C. John; Rich, Terrell D., editors 2005. Bird Conservation Implementation and Integration in the Americas: Proceedings of the Third International Partners in Flight Conference. 2002 March 20-24; Asilomar, California, Volume 2 Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-191. Albany, CA: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station: p. 918-923

 


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