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Title: Small-scale monitoring - can it be integrated with large-scale programs?

Author: Downes, C. M.; Bart, J.; Collins, B. T.; Craig, B.; Dale, B.; Dunn, E. H.; Francis, C. M.; Woodley, S.; Zorn, P.;

Date: 2005

Source: In: Ralph, C. John; Rich, Terrell D., editors 2005. Bird Conservation Implementation and Integration in the Americas: Proceedings of the Third International Partners in Flight Conference. 2002 March 20-24; Asilomar, California, Volume 2 Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-191. Albany, CA: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station: p. 993-996

Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: There are dozens of programs and methodologies for monitoring and inventory of bird populations, differing in geographic scope, species focus, field methods and purpose. However, most of the emphasis has been placed on large-scale monitoring programs. People interested in assessing bird numbers and long-term trends in small geographic areas such as a local birding area, or in management units such as parks or regional forests often find it hard to get guidance on which methods would be best for them while also providing useful results. To help meet this need, we have developed a set of recommendations aimed both at land managers and ornithologists who want to conduct detailed and rigorous inventory, population monitoring or comparison of sites, as well as at individuals or groups who simply want to participate in bird monitoring and contribute to cooperative programs or to involve the public in a useful manner. Wherever possible, emphasis is placed on methods that are useful for site-specific monitoring but could also contribute to national programs. The guidelines for small-scale monitoring outlined in this paper are based on the results of a workshop, held in November 2001, sponsored by the Canadian Wildlife Service and the Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Network, Environment Canada. Because a more detailed paper is planned for publication in the near future, we provide only a short overview of the guidelines we have been developing for monitoring and surveying birds at small geographic scales. For details on techniques, we refer to a variety of publications that provide detailed information and background on the monitoring techniques mentioned in this paper (e.g. Baillie 1990; Ralph et al. 1993, 1995; Bibby 2000; Downes et al. 2000). For the purposes of this paper, we loosely define the term “small scale” as any area too small for national programs to provide meaningful results; these programs are usually designed to cover an area the size of a province or an entire physiographic region. Our recommendations are suitable for use at sites ranging in size from a few hectares to a large national park (e.g. 10,000 hectares). Our recommendations complement those developed for U.S. National Parks (http://www.nature.nps.gov/im/monitor/birds.htm), but cover a broader range of monitoring goals and participation levels.

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Downes, C. M.; Bart, J.; Collins, B. T.; Craig, B.; Dale, B.; Dunn, E. H.; Francis, C. M.; Woodley, S.; Zorn, P. 2005. Small-scale monitoring - can it be integrated with large-scale programs?. In: Ralph, C. John; Rich, Terrell D., editors 2005. Bird Conservation Implementation and Integration in the Americas: Proceedings of the Third International Partners in Flight Conference. 2002 March 20-24; Asilomar, California, Volume 2 Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-191. Albany, CA: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station: p. 993-996

 


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