Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern Research Station
Help
 

Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

View PDF (361.0 KB bytes)

Title: The conservation and management of migratory and resident birds and their habitats on Department of Defense lands

Author: Hautzenroder, Joe;

Date: 2005

Source: In: Ralph, C. John; Rich, Terrell D., editors 2005. Bird Conservation Implementation and Integration in the Americas: Proceedings of the Third International Partners in Flight Conference. 2002 March 20-24; Asilomar, California, Volume 2 Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-191. Albany, CA: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station: p. 1165-1168

Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Managing over 25 million acres of land on hundreds of installations, the United States Department of Defense (DoD) plays a key role in Partners in Flight (PIF). Department of Defense lands represent a critical network of habitats for neotropical migratory birds, offering these birds migratory stopover areas for resting and feeding, and suitable sites for nesting and rearing their young. While DoD is a large federal landholder, we are not recognized as a land management agency. Unlike most of the agencies represented here whose primary mission is to accomplish basic conserve natural resources management, our mission is inherently destructive. The use of air-to-ground ordnance, tracked vehicles, ship-to-shore ordinance, underwater testing and amphibious assault maneuvers tend to take a toll on the environment. No one would argue that we must provide these training opportunities for our nation's armed forces. I think we would all agree that we want those who go in harm's way to have every advantage, and that requires realistic training. At the same time, though, the general public, government regulators, and many non-governmental organizations expect us to accomplish this mission with as little impact to the environment as possible.

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

XML: View XML

Citation:


Hautzenroder, Joe 2005. The conservation and management of migratory and resident birds and their habitats on Department of Defense lands. In: Ralph, C. John; Rich, Terrell D., editors 2005. Bird Conservation Implementation and Integration in the Americas: Proceedings of the Third International Partners in Flight Conference. 2002 March 20-24; Asilomar, California, Volume 2 Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-191. Albany, CA: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station: p. 1165-1168

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.