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Title: Larix P. Mill.: larch

Author: Shearer, Raymond C.;

Date: 2008

Source: In: Bonner, Franklin T.; Karrfalt, Robert P., eds. The Woody Plant Seed Manual. Agric. Handbook No. 727. Washington, DC. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service. p. 637-650.

Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: The larches - Larix P. Mill. - of the world are usually grouped into 10 species that are widely distributed over much of the mountainous, cooler regions of the Northern Hemisphere (Hora 1981; Krussmann 1985; Ostenfeld and Larsen 1930; Rehder 1940; Schmidt 1995). Some species dominate at the northern limits of boreal forests and others occur above subalpine forests (Gower and Richards 1990). Seven species are included (table 1) - the others, Master larch (L. mastersiana Rehd. & Wils.), Chinese larch (L. potaninii Batal.), and Himalayan larch (L. griffithiana (Carr.)) - are rarely planted in the United States. All species (except possibly Himalayan larch) are hardy in the United States (Bailey 1939). However, the seeds should come from a site with comparable conditions, as demonstrated at the Wind River Arboretum in southwestern Washington, where 7 larch species, some with several varieties, and 1 hybrid were planted from 1913 to 1939 (Silen and Olson 1992). European larches there are doing better than Asian species in this warm, moist Washington state climate. The native western larch specimens from more continental climates with lower humidity are doing poorly. In 1992, a larch arboretum containing all species, several varieties, and 3 hybrids of larch was established at Hungry Horse, Montana, within the natural range of western larch (Shearer and others 1995).

Keywords: Larix P. Mill., larch

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Shearer, Raymond C. 2008. Larix P. Mill.: larch. In: Bonner, Franklin T.; Karrfalt, Robert P., eds. The Woody Plant Seed Manual. Agric. Handbook No. 727. Washington, DC. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service. p. 637-650.

 


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