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Title: Wood-destroying organisms in the new millennium : where have we gone since Bend 1989?

Author: Haverty, Michael; Micales-Glaeser, Jessie;

Date: 2004

Source: Proceedings of the Fifth Joint Meeting of the Forest Insect Work Conference and Western International Forest Disease Work Conference : San Diego, California, April 26-30, 2004. Davis, CA : Pacific Southwest Research Station, 2004: pages 72-74.

Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication

Description: At the joint meeting of the Western International Forest Disease Work Conference and the Western Forest Insect Work Conference, held in Bend, OR, on September 13, 1989, a symposium was convened entitled "Current Research on Wood-destroying Organisms and Future Prospects for Protecting Wood in Use. "Presentations were made by three pathologists and nine entomologists. At that time the taxonomy of wood-decay fungi was primarily based on morphology; new techniques using genetic and immunological tests were introduced. Nondestructive evaluation for detection of wood decay and presence of termite infestations was put forward as a new concept. The idea of termites as beneficial organisms was discussed; they provide habitat for wildlife in Australia. Cuticular hydrocarbons were debuted as taxonomic characters for species determination in termites. Agonistic (not agnostic) behavior in termites was described as a means of differentiating colonies and species. Tunneling behavior of subterranean termites was discussed in the context of baiting. The use of baits for direct control of mound building termites in Australia was examined. The behavior and ecology of exotic subterranean termites in Canada was discussed and contrasted with native populations in the United States. Finally, the development of slow-acting pesticides and their role in baiting technology for control of subterranean termites in the United States was presented. These subjects provided the basis for presentations at this meeting In San Diego, CA, in 2004.

Keywords: Pests, biological control, wood preservatives, wood-decaying-fungi, research, wood biodegradation, termites, nondestructive testing, molds, health aspects, fungi, classification, preservatives, wood decay, termite control

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Haverty, Michael; Micales-Glaeser, Jessie 2004. Wood-destroying organisms in the new millennium : where have we gone since Bend 1989?. Proceedings of the Fifth Joint Meeting of the Forest Insect Work Conference and Western International Forest Disease Work Conference : San Diego, California, April 26-30, 2004. Davis, CA : Pacific Southwest Research Station, 2004: pages 72-74.

 


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