Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern Research Station
Help
 

Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

View PDF (152 KB)

Title: Oak woodland vegetation dynamics: a state and transition approach

Author: George, Melvin R.; Alonso, Maximo F.;

Date: 2008

Source: In: Merenlender, Adina; McCreary, Douglas; Purcell, Kathryn L., tech. eds. 2008. Proceedings of the sixth California oak symposium: today's challenges, tomorrow's opportunities. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-217. Albany, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station: pp. 93-104

Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: California’s oak-woodlands are a complex, often multi-layered mosaic of grassland, shrubland, and woodland patches. While soil type and depth, topography, aspect, and geological substrate influence the distribution of these patches, disturbance and biological interactions are also important determinants of the patchy distribution of these plant communities. Fire intensity and frequency can change the structure of these patches, while grazing can affect the speed of the species replacement. Different re-establishment strategies of woody species interacting with prevailing weather following disturbance can also produce changes in the plant community composition at the patch level which are often smaller than a soil mapping unit or an ecological site. While our knowledge of vegetation dynamics in the oak-woodlands is not great, what we do know, or can reasonably hypothesize, is being organized into a format that is sensible and accessible to natural resource managers. State and transition models have been proposed as a format for organizing the complex body of knowledge and concepts describing vegetation dynamics in rangeland ecosystems. Natural and man-caused vegetation change can be incorporated into these models. In this review paper, we will describe oak-woodland vegetation dynamics using a state and transition format.

Keywords: Oak-woodlands, state and transition models, succession, vegetation dynamics.

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

XML: View XML

Citation:


George, Melvin R.; Alonso, Maximo F. 2008. Oak woodland vegetation dynamics: a state and transition approach. In: Merenlender, Adina; McCreary, Douglas; Purcell, Kathryn L., tech. eds. 2008. Proceedings of the sixth California oak symposium: today's challenges, tomorrow's opportunities. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-217. Albany, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station: pp. 93-104

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.